GRAB - Persistent narratives, persistent failures: Why GM crops do not—and will not—“feed the world”

Authors

  • Taarini Chopra Canadian Biotechnology Action Network; Seeds of Diversity Canada

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.15353/cfs-rcea.v2i2.123

Keywords:

GMOs, persistent narratives

Abstract

It has been almost two decades since genetically modified (GM; also called genetically engineered or GE) crops were first commercialized in North America, and anywhere from five to ten years since they have been grown in various countries in the Global South. Though short, their entire history has been a controversial one. In fact, debate about their potential environmental and health impacts, their predicted success in increasing yields and incomes, and the corporate control that accompanies them, was spirited even before the first GM crop was ever commercialized, and remains heated today.

Author Biography

Taarini Chopra, Canadian Biotechnology Action Network; Seeds of Diversity Canada

Taarini Chopra is a researcher and campaigner with the Canadian Biotechnology Action Network. She is also the publications coordinator at Seeds of Diversity Canada, a researcher with the Global Food Politics Group at the University of Waterloo, and the co-chair of the Waterloo Region Food Systems Roundtable.

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Published

2015-09-08

How to Cite

Chopra, T. (2015). GRAB - Persistent narratives, persistent failures: Why GM crops do not—and will not—“feed the world”. Canadian Food Studies / La Revue Canadienne Des études Sur l’alimentation, 2(2), 209–216. https://doi.org/10.15353/cfs-rcea.v2i2.123