“They hold on tight to the healthy eating, we hold on tight to our food safety, and how do we bridge that?”: determinants of successful collaboration between food safety and food security practitioners in British Columbia, Canada

Authors

  • Kelsey A Speed School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo
  • Samantha B Meyer School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo
  • Rhona M Hanning School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo
  • Karen Rideout Environmental Health Services, BC Centre for Disease Control
  • Melanie Kurrein Provincial Health Services Authority, BC Centre for Disease Control, Population and Public Health
  • Shannon E Majowicz School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.15353/cfs-rcea.v7i1.384

Keywords:

food safety, food security, public health, qualitative research, cooperative behaviour

Abstract

Food safety and food security are two important public health sectors within Canada, which aim to address foodborne disease and food insecurity, respectively.  While these sectors are often siloed within public health organizations, the actions of the two sectors often interact and conflict at the program level despite their common goal of improving population health.  The objective of the present study was to identify determinants that influenced the success of collaboration between practitioners of the two sectors in British Columbia, to inform Canadian food policy.  We inductively analyzed 14 interviews with practitioners working in the two sectors who had experience with successful collaboration. Data were interpreted in consultation with an inter-professional collaboration framework.  Participants identified determinants at the systemic level, including the cultural, professional, educational, legislative, and political systems, which were often considered barriers to collaboration.  Participants also identified determinants at the organizational level that influenced the success of collaboration between the sectors, including: the organization’s structure and philosophy, leadership, resources, and communication mechanisms.  Finally, participants identified interactional determinants as ways to overcome existing barriers, including: willingness to collaborate, trust, communication, mutual respect, and taking a solutions-oriented approach.  Practitioners working in food safety and food security can apply the interactional determinants identified in this study to mitigate existing barriers to collaboration and support more synergistic food policies.

Author Biography

Karen Rideout, Environmental Health Services, BC Centre for Disease Control

Present address: Karen Rideout Consulting, Vancouver, BC, V6K 1M7

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Published

2020-07-14

How to Cite

Speed, K. A., Meyer, S. B., Hanning, R. M., Rideout, K., Kurrein, M., & Majowicz, S. E. (2020). “They hold on tight to the healthy eating, we hold on tight to our food safety, and how do we bridge that?”: determinants of successful collaboration between food safety and food security practitioners in British Columbia, Canada. Canadian Food Studies / La Revue Canadienne Des études Sur l’alimentation, 7(1), 44–63. https://doi.org/10.15353/cfs-rcea.v7i1.384