Food pedagogy for transformative social change

Authors

  • Chelsea Klinke University of Calgary
  • Gertrude Korkor Samar

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.15353/cfs-rcea.v8i3.485

Keywords:

FOOD SYSTEMS; SOCIAL CHANGE; FOOD PEDAGOGY; ACTIVIST SCHOLARSHIP; AGROECOLOGY; TRANSFORMATIVE; COMMUNITY; FOOD SECURITY; EXPERIENTIAL (EXL); PARTICIPATORY

Abstract

The contemporary global agrarian regime has altered the patterns of food production, circulation, and consumption. Its efforts towards food security vis-á-vis capitalist modes of mechanized cultivation have produced large-scale climatic and socioeconomic ramifications, including the dispossession of small-scale farmers from their lands and positions in market value-chains. In an effort to improve the dynamics of contemporary agro-food systems, food practitioners and scholars are engaging in critical analyses of land-grabbing, the feminization of agriculture, extractive-led development, and more. However, we argue that there is a gap between Food Studies scholarship and community-based transformative engagement. To support social justice frameworks, our paper calls for an academic paradigm shift wherein learner-centered experiential classrooms bridge academic-public divides and enhance student learning. Through a case-study of urban farming in Calgary, we also explore topics in place-based learning and participatory approaches that acknowledge and integrate Indigenous ways of knowing, doing, being, and connecting. Our paper provides strategies for supporting local food systems through activist scholarship, capacity building of leadership and technical skills in advanced urban farming, and intercultural relationship building. We conclude by evaluating the success of our approach, presenting potential benefits and challenges, and providing recommendations for best practices in food scholarship to support transformative change.

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Published

2021-10-30

How to Cite

Klinke, C., & Samar, G. K. (2021). Food pedagogy for transformative social change. Canadian Food Studies / La Revue Canadienne Des études Sur l’alimentation, 8(3). https://doi.org/10.15353/cfs-rcea.v8i3.485