From bitter to sweet: Continuing the conversation on Indigenous food sovereignty through sharing stories, engaging communities, and embracing culture

Authors

  • Kelly Skinner University of Waterloo http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0989-8841
  • Tabitha Robin Martens University of Manitoba
  • Jaime Cidro University of Winnipeg
  • Kristin Burnett Lakehead University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.15353/cfs-rcea.v5i2.323

Keywords:

Indigenous food, sovereignty, community

Abstract

The desire to undertake a special issue on Indigenous Food arose during a conversation that took place between the co-editors following a panel on the same topic at the annual conference of the Native American Indigenous Studies Association in 2015. The panel contained a mixture of conversations that focused on the meanings and relationships of Indigenous peoples with land and food; the efforts and importance of re-knowing and re-defining those relationships through stories centred around community and family; and the ways in which settler colonialism operates to undermine Indigenous food sovereignty at both the structural and epistemological levels.

Author Biographies

Kelly Skinner, University of Waterloo

Assistant Professor, School of Public Health and Health Systems

Tabitha Robin Martens, University of Manitoba

PhD Candidate, Interdisciplinary Studies

Jaime Cidro, University of Winnipeg

Associate Professor, Anthropology

Kristin Burnett, Lakehead University

Associate Professor, Indigenous Learning

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Published

2018-05-27

How to Cite

Skinner, K., Martens, T. R., Cidro, J., & Burnett, K. (2018). From bitter to sweet: Continuing the conversation on Indigenous food sovereignty through sharing stories, engaging communities, and embracing culture. Canadian Food Studies / La Revue Canadienne Des études Sur l’alimentation, 5(2), 3–8. https://doi.org/10.15353/cfs-rcea.v5i2.323