An unconditional basic income is necessary but insufficient to transition towards just food futures

Authors

  • Elaine Power Queens University
  • Aric McBay

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.15353/cfs-rcea.v9i2.533

Keywords:

basic income, just food futures, rural vitality, food system justice, family farmers

Abstract

In food systems scholarship, the case for basic income to reduce food insecurity is well-established. Less well-appreciated is the potential for basic income to support young farmers, improve rural vitality, promote gender equality and racial justice in agriculture, and assist farmers in building resilience in the face of climate chaos and other overlapping crises. In and of itself, basic income cannot transform the food system. However, by guaranteeing an income floor and thus freedom from necessity, it could be a potent tool in radical, democratic struggles against systems of oppression and towards justice—in the food system and beyond.

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Published

2022-07-15

How to Cite

Power, E., & McBay, A. (2022). An unconditional basic income is necessary but insufficient to transition towards just food futures. Canadian Food Studies / La Revue Canadienne Des études Sur l’alimentation, 9(2), 31–37. https://doi.org/10.15353/cfs-rcea.v9i2.533